The common symptoms of hormone deprivation following menopause.

“Menopause includes the loss of several hormones as their production ceases. This hormone deprivation results in a variety of symptoms in most menopausal women. http://menopausehealthmatters.com/symptoms-of-menopause/ has a complete description of the most common 34 symptoms. This source is in December 2015, and I recommend it for further information.” Bill Chesnut, MD

  • Common Symptoms
  • Hot Flashes. Hot flashes, also known as hot flushes, are a sudden, transient sensation of warmth or heat that spreads over the body, creating a flushing, or redness, that is particularly noticeable on the face and upper body.
  • Night Sweats. Night sweats are classified as severe hot flashes that occur during sleep accompanied by intense bouts of sweating. Also known as “sleep hyperhidrosis”, night sweats aren’t actually a sleep disorder, but a common perspiration disorder that occurs during sleep in menopausal women.
  • Irregular Periods
  • Loss of Libido. Everyone experiences peaks and valleys in sexual desire, an ebb and flow in libido that could be caused by any of a variety of factors. However, for women going through menopause, this sudden drop in desire for sexual activity or intimacy can be troubling. In menopausal women, the main cause of low sex drive is hormonal imbalance, predominantly androgen deficiency.
  • Vaginal Dryness. Vaginal dryness occurs when the usually moist and soft feeling of the lining of the vagina disappears, bringing about symptoms such as itchiness and irritation. When estrogen levels drop during perimenopause, the vaginal tissue becomes drier, thinner, and less elastic. Lack of lubrication leads to sex becoming uncomfortable, and the vagina is frequently itchy, easily irritated, and more prone to infections.
  • Mood Swings. Menopausal mood swings are surprisingly common, but can be hard to cope with. A woman experiencing mood swings may feel like she is on a rollercoaster of emotions: one minute she’s up, the next minute she’s down. Mood swings can be sudden and intense, although the experience of them may differ from woman to woman.
  • Changes
  • Fatigue. Fatigue, one of the most common menopause symptoms, is defined as an ongoing and persistent feeling of weakness, tiredness, and lowered energy levels, rather than just sleepiness or drowsiness. Other characteristics of fatigue may include apathy, irritability, and decreased attention span. Crashing fatigue is a phenomenon which comes on suddenly, leaving a woman devoid of energy and unable to continue her activity.
  • Hair Loss. Hair loss, one of the most physically noticeable menopause symptoms, is caused by estrogen deficiency, because hair follicles need estrogen to sustain hair growth.
  • Sleep Disorders. Waking many times during the night, tossing and turning, and insomnia, are all sleep disorders connected with menopause. Women going through menopause may find that their sleep is less restful and that getting to sleep becomes increasingly difficult.
  • Difficult Concentrating. In the lead-up to menopause, many women are concerned to find they have trouble remembering things, experience mental blocks, or have difficulty concentrating. This can be confusing or worrying for women, and can have a big impact on all aspects of daily life. The main reason why these symptoms occur during menopause is hormonal imbalance, specifically estrogen deficiency.
  1. Memory Lapses. Women approaching menopause often complain of memory loss, memory lapses, and an inability to concentrate. Misplaced car keys, skipped appointments, forgotten birthdays, and missed trains of thought might seem like trivial occurrences, but these can be extremely distressing for women who have never missed a beat before. However, thesememory lapsesare a normal symptom of menopause, associated with low levels of estrogen and with high stress levels.
  • Dizziness. Dizziness is a transient spinning sensation, which may be accompanied by a feeling of lightheadedness or unsteadiness, as well as the inability to maintain balance upon standing or while walking.
  • Weight Gain. Weight gain, specifically a thickening around the waist, is another sign of changing hormones levels during menopause. While some sources claim that menopause has nothing to do with weight gain, hormonal changes during menopause actually influence weight gain and redistribution of fat.
  • Incontinence. Incontinence in menopausal women can be divided into three types. Stress incontinence is the accidental release of urine while laughing, coughing, sneezing, or due to over-exertion. This usually happens when the internal muscles fail to work effectively, because of age, surgery, or childbirth. With urge incontinence, the bladder develops a “mind of its own,” contracting and emptying whenever full despite an individual’s conscious efforts to resist. Overflow incontinence is the absence of the sensation of a full bladder, whereby accidental urination occurs because the individual doesn’t realize the bladder is full.
  • Bloating. Bloating occurs in most women throughout their lives, due to digestive issues or as a part of PMS. This symptom is characterized by a swollen belly, a feeling of tightness, and discomfort or pain in the stomach area.
  • Allergies. Hormones and the immune system are inextricably linked, so hormonal changes during menopause can lead to an increase in allergies among menopausal women.
  • Brittle Nails. Nail appearance can tell a lot about a person’s general health and habits. There are a variety of nail changes that occur during menopause that could indicate an underlying problem, but the most common is brittle nails, or nails that are softer, or that crack, split, or break horizontally across the top of the nail.
    • Changes in Odor. Changes in body odor can make the menopausal women experiencing them very self-conscious. Menopausal hormonal changes cause an increase in sweat production, in response to physical menopause symptoms such as hot flashes and night sweats, or psychological symptoms such as anxiety and panic disorder.
    • Irregular Heartbeat. Irregular heartbeat is one of the more concerning menopause symptoms. Bouts of pounding, rapid heartbeat scare many women because of their sudden onset and the difficulty in calming them. One of the causes of these symptoms during menopause is hormonal imbalance.
    • Depression. Feelings of sadness can be normal, appropriate, and even necessary during life’s setbacks or losses. Feeling blue or unhappy for short periods of time without reason or warning is also normal and ordinary. But if such feelings persist or impair daily life, it could signal a depressive disorder.
    • Anxiety. Anxiety is a vague or intense feeling caused by physical or psychological conditions, typified by feelings of agitation and loss of emotional control.
    • Irritability. Irritability is a pervading “bad mood” characterized by feelings of stress, reduced patience and tolerance, and lashing out in anger or frustration over matters that may seem trivial to others. Irritability during menopause is most often caused by hormonal changes, whereby low levels of circulating estrogen have an adverse effect on the neurotransmitters in the brain that are responsible for regulating mood.
    • Panic Disorder. Irritability is a pervading “bad mood” characterized by feelings of stress, reduced patience and tolerance, and lashing out in anger or frustration over matters that may seem trivial to others. Irritability during menopause is most often caused by hormonal changes, whereby low levels of circulating estrogen have an adverse effect on the neurotransmitters in the brain that are responsible for regulating mood.
    • Pains
    • Breast Pain. Typically, breast pain is characterized as a generalized discomfort or pain associated with touching or applying pressure to the breasts. Breast pain, soreness, or breast tenderness in one or both breasts is symptomatic of hormonal changes.
    • Headaches. Headaches can be caused by a variety of factors such as muscle tension, drinking too much alcohol, or as a side effect of common illnesses such as the flu. However, headaches are also linked with the effects of hormonal imbalance.
    • Joint Pain. Joint pain is one of the most common symptoms of menopause. It is thought that more than half of all postmenopausal women experience varying degrees of joint pain. Joint pain is an unexplained soreness in muscles and joints, which is unrelated to trauma or exercise, but may be related to the effects of fluctuating hormone levels on the immune system. Estrogen helps prevent inflammation in the joints, so low levels of estrogen during menopause can lead to increased instances of inflammation, and therefore increased joint pain.
    • Burning Tongue. Burning mouth syndrome is a complex, vexing condition in which a burning pain occurs on the tongue or lips, or throughout the whole mouth, without visible signs of irritation, but accompanied with other symptoms such as bad breath or a bad taste in the mouth.
    • Electric Shocks. This symptom presents a peculiar “electric” sensation, like the feeling of a rubber band snapping in the layer of tissue between skin and muscle, or, when it appears as a precursor to a hot flash, it is often felt across the head. Electric shocks usually only occur for a brief moment, but it can still be quite an unpleasant sensation. The cause of electric shock sensation in menopause is thought to be related to the effect of fluctuating estrogen levels on the cardiovascular and nervous systems.
    • Digestive Problems. Digestive problems are defined as changes in gastrointestinal function, with symptoms such as excessive gas production, gastrointestinal cramping, and nausea.
    • Gum Problems. Gum problems are common among menopausal women; although these could be due to poor dental hygiene, they are also caused by menopausal hormonal changes, mainly estrogen deficiency.
    • Muscle Tension. Muscle tension is when muscles, especially the ones in the neck, shoulders, and back, feel tight or strained, or when there is a general increase in aches, pains, soreness, and stiffness throughout the body. Muscle
    • Itchy Skin. When estrogen levels drop during perimenopause, collagen production also slows down. Collagen is responsible for keeping skin toned, fresh-looking, and resilient. So when the body starts running low on collagen, it shows in the skin, as the skin gets thinner, drier, flakier, and less youthful-looking.
    • Tingling Extremities. Tingling extremities is where menopausal women experience the feeling of “creepy-crawlies” walking all over their skin, a burning sensation like an insect sting, or super-sensitivity in their hands, arms, legs, and feet.
    • Others
    • Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a degenerative bone disorder, characterized by thinning and weakening of the bone and a general decrease in bone mass and density. Menopause negatively affects bone growth. Normally, bones go through a process whereby old bone is replaced with new bone cells, but the body’s ability to handle this process changes with age.